USS Pueblo Ship Plans

Today’s NDC Blog post concerns a painful episode in modern U.S. history, an earlier chapter of a story that has been in the news frequently over the past months. On January 23, 1968, units of the North Korean Navy captured the environmental research ship USS Pueblo (AGER-2) in international waters off the east coast of North Korean near the port city of Wonson while she was conducting SIGINT operations in the area. One American sailor died during the capture, and the surviving 82 officers and men of the ship were imprisoned at two different locations in North Korea until their release on December 23, 1968. The North Koreans kept the Pueblo, and she was moored initially in the port city of Wonson. In 1996, the North Koreans moved the ship around the Korean peninsula and up the country’s west coast to a new berth in the Taedong River in the capital city of Pyongyang.  Pueblo is now moored outside a new museum in the North Korean capital, however she is still on the Naval Vessel Registry as an active commissioned warship in the U.S. Navy.

In this post, the NDC presents two drawings of the Pueblo which is, I believe, their first public appearance. These drawings are a part of the Pueblo historical record series created by the U.S. Navy’s Naval Security Group. The NDC is in the process of organizing and declassifying this record series, although we anticipate only a small number of records will be declassified from this effort.
As for the drawings themselves, in terms familiar to naval architects and ship afficianadoes we are presenting the Pueblo’s inboard and outboard profiles. An inboard profile is a cutaway view of the ship—you are seeing her as if she had been cut with a knife down her centerline. An outboard profile is a view of the ship as she would appear to an observer outside the skin of the ship. As you can see from the poor quality of these digital reproductions, these drawings are not originals. They are thermofax copies made either by or for Naval Security Group as part of their Pueblo history file. The drawings do not contain the ship plan data block usually found on drawings of this type. As a result, we don’t know the date of the plans, but they probably date from 1966, about when the ship started her conversion from a light cargo ship (AKL) to an AGER. We are sure, however, that the drawings are of Pueblo as her outboard profile carries the GER 2 hull designation.  Ironically, the ship was actually commissioned on May 13, 1967 with her former hull designation AKL-44 freshly painted on her bow.

I wish to thank NDC staff member Gary Denholm and the NARA Photo Imaging Lab staff Cecilia Epstein and Phillip Corrigan for conserving these drawings and digitizing them.

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416 New Entries Released by the NDC Between April 25 and May 31, 2013

The NDC has released a listing of 416 entriesExcel document that have completed declassification processing between April 25 and May 31, 2013 and are now available for researcher request. This release records from both military and civilian agencies.

Highlights include:

  • Central Policy Files from the U.S. Army Office Of The Assistant Chief Of Staff For Intelligence,
  • Naval History and Heritage Command, World War II Command Files,
  • Atomic Energy Commission Subject Files of Chairman John McCone,
  • Department of State Subject Files Pertaining to the U.S. Admissions Program for Indochinese Refugees, 1980 – 1981,
  • Records Of The National Bipartisan Commission On Central America (Kissinger Commission),
  • United Nations Command, Prisoner Of War Command Records from the Korean Conflict,
  • United States Information Agency Country and Subject Files for Latin America and Spain, and
  • Air Force Directorate Of Plans; Secret Central Files

How to Request Records or Order Copies:

Requests to access the newly released records or to order copies should be directed to Archives 2 Reference at 301-837-3510 or archives2reference@nara.gov.

(When making a request, please cite the HMS Entry and Series Title.)

Posted in New Openings

Protected: 2013 NDC Training ConferenceTest

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Posted in 2013 NDC Training Conference

NDC Releases 170 New Entries Between December 7, 2012 and April 24, 2013

The NDC has released a listing of 170 entries Excel document that have completed declassification processing between December 7, 2012 and April 24, 2013 and are now available for researcher request. This release records from both military and civilian agencies.

Highlights include:

  • Records from the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, Fort Holabird,
  • Naval Ordnance Systems Command records related to the Port Chicago Explosion,
  • Atomic Energy Commission Patent Files,
  • Country and Subject Files from the United States Information Agency,
  • Naval Air Systems Command Research and Development Files,
  • Far East Air Force Headquarters Bomber Command Korean Conflict Era Correspondence,
  • Tariff and Trade records from the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, and
  • Air Force records from Wright-Patterson, Langley, Arnold, Scott and Andrews Air Force Bases.

Requests to access the newly released records or to order copies should be directed to Archives 2 Reference at 301-837-3510 or archives2reference@nara.gov.

(When making a request, please cite the HMS Entry and Series Title.)

Posted in New Openings | 1 Comment

The Correspondence of Curtis Lemay

The Correspondence of Curtis Lemay

By: Rhiannon Roberts

While stationed at Offutt AFB, Nebraska; Lt. Gen. Curtis Lemay coordinated the Korean War effort through diligent command of the SAC or Strategic Air Command; the founding of this particular organization was to support bomber aircraft with nuclear capabilities. The following correspondence is from Lt. Gen. Lemay and Brig. Gen. Robert H. Terrell that concerns new weapons tactics that would eliminate the threat of North Korean retaliatory efforts that had been eliminating the accuracy of B-29 bombers.

One device in particular, known as the M-17 anti-ricochet device, developed by the Japanese; was created to prevent the accuracy of North Korean flak launched on American bombers. However this was only after several series of testing were completed that proved it would be successful in the ensuing battles. The following photographs are evidence of the B-29 conducting these tests.

Curtis Lemay correspondence, all pages

The last two letters are from Lt. Gen. Lemay to Brig. Gen. James E. Briggs; who was the commanding officer of the Far East Air Force (FEAF) based out of Okinawa, Japan. These letters indicate that while North Korean flak had created a sense of urgency to establish a method that could be used to counter their effectiveness, coordinating a testing location for the M-17 anti-ricochet device proved difficult.

This information was taken from the following and has been declassified for public viewing on March 28, 2013:
Record Group 342
Boxes 1-6 (FRC)
Entry 342-53-7010
NND 001872/64444

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Armistice Agreement Rough Draft 1952-Korean War

By: Rhiannon Roberts

The Korean War officially ended on July 27, 1953 with an armistice agreement signed by Lt. Gen. William Harrison Jr., Representative of the United Nations; and Gen. Nam II, Representative for the People’s Republic of China and North Korea. While the world had waited with bated breath for some reprieve from the deadliest conflict since World War II, many world leaders had attempted to establish a mutually beneficial way of ending the war for several years prior to the final armistice. To many this intense desire for reconciliation originated from the failure of each side making any lasting advances into the territory of the opposition. From 1951-1952 these attempts toward resolution centered on the establishment of a contract outlining specific points that each side would agree to abide by. While in the end the acceptance of these drafts had proved unsuccessful, they had, however; paved the way for the armistice that has created an essence of peace on the Korean Peninsula for the last 60 years.

Please see attachment for the “Current Draft of the Armistice Agreement Revised 10 April 1952”. Special attention should be made to the section on page 26, in which the intended signature parties were Kim Il Sung, Peng Teh Huai and Gen. Matthew Ridgeway.

While several issues pertaining to territorial rights, as well as the legality of civil liberties for the affected population prevented a quick resolution, other topics that were equally important such as the presence of the United States military in Japan; created an equal cause for concern. (Article 16)

The importance of these resolutions is that even with the citizens of Korea living today in a constant state of ready preparedness for continuing the war; the fundamental guidelines initiated by the founders of the armistice agreement have been long-lasting. Therefore, they have prevented up to date, a new surge in hostile forces within the volatile region. Let us hope that the success continues for 60 more years.

This information was taken from the following and has been declassified for public viewing on March 28, 2013:
Record Group 342
Boxes 1-6 (FRC)
Entry 342-53-7010
NND 001872/64444

Armistice Draft 1952

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"Introducing Miss Hostile Mortar Locating Equipment – Miss KQP-1 to her friends – she aims to please!"

by Ms Sarah Anderson

The photo was found tucked away in a folder describing the U.S. Army-Marine Corps Steering Group requirements for hostile mortar locating equipment for use in South Vietnam.

Miss Hostile Mortar

According to the report, during World War II and Korea “hostile mortars caused a greater percentage of casualties that any other weapon employed by the enemy.”  This system would target the hostile mortars before or shortly after they began firing.  Unfortunately, after field testing in Vietnam the system proved unsatisfactory.  Despite Miss KQP-1’s best efforts, the project was recommended for termination in December of 1966.”

The folder makes no mention of the woman.  Anyone recognize this bombshell beauty?

HMS REID: UD-WW 1391

RG 544 US Army Materiel Command HQ, R & D Cntrl File 68; Box 1 Folder 12

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Note by the Executive Secretary for North Atlantic Council 1951

Today’s post comes to us from NDC blogger Neil Carmichael.

Thank you Ms. Anderson for finding this great document this morning. This declassified document needs no introduction.  The document can be found in Record Group 43 within the Council of Foreign Minsters: General Records, ca. 1945-1955, box 290.  The Record Entry 617693 and ARC ID 1488684.

NATO Notice D7-D.N/8, September 16, 1951

Posted in New Openings

Lionel Hampton, Jazz legend and President’s “Ambassador of Goodwill”

by Mr. James Carroll

IEA Area Subject Files (RG 306 U.S. Information Agency – Record Entry ID: HS1-65869038. Finding Aid: UD-2010 44). Records that have been recently declassified include cultural presentations, fairs, expositions, and educational and cultural exchanges.

While recently processing declassified materials at the National Archives, College Park location, I came across some fascinating photos and supporting documents related to Lionel Hampton.  Okay, I admit it, some younger folks reading this may scratch their heads and mumble “who?”  But, as I learned, Mr. Hampton was an American icon and jazz legend who rubbed elbows with presidents and spread American goodwill (and great jazz) around the world.

In 1969, when Mr. Hampton was already a “rock star” of the jazz world, and in his early 60’s, he was tagged by then-President Nixon to travel to the Far East, including gigs in Japan, Thailand, and Taiwan. The U.S. State Department facilitated the tour. Mr. Hampton, known as “The Hamp” traveled with his band on a month-long tour, giving performances which were well received, while meeting foreign royals and learning more about other cultures and traditions. His instrument of choice was the vibraphone, but he also played piano and percussion.

President Nixon sent a letter to Mr. Hampton and his wife Gladys as they embarked on their Far East journey.  In it he wrote, “I am delighted to hear that you are traveling again to the Far East to continue the effort which all of us share in creating understanding and goodwill between Americans and people everywhere.  Mrs. Nixon joins me in wishing you and Mrs. Hampton every success in your latest venture as Ambassador of Goodwill.”

Sadly, at the outset of the tour, former President Eisenhower died, and the news was relayed to the Hamptons, who were friends of the late president. Mr. and Mrs. Hampton knew President Eisenhower and had performed at both of his inaugural balls. It was Eisenhower who in 1957 officially bestowed upon Lionel Hampton the title “American Goodwill Ambassador.”

The Far East tour was a huge success! One of the documents in the Archives described his time in Thailand: “Lionel Hampton has a charisma all his own.  His personality reaches out to people and they react favorably. He is completely cooperative and equally engaging to the Thai public whether playing clubs, giving jazz workshops, performing for the Royal Household or touring the markets and landmarks of the city.”  In Tokyo it was reported that “Hampton was joined onstage by leading Japanese jazz musicians for a rousing jam session.”  He used music as a bridge between national cultures; they were all speaking the same language: Jazz.

In 1936, Mr. Hampton became part of one of the first racially integrated jazz groups, The Benny Goodman Quartet. The group would go on to record and tour to large audiences around the country.  Yet, Mr. Hampton would become a superstar in his own right, headlining his own big band.  Some of their hits included: Stardust, Toledo Blade, Flying Home, and Hamp’s Boogie Woogie. A little known fact not publicly known about Mr. Hampton was that the music he made helped pave the way for rock ‘n’ roll.

Mr. Hampton worked with many young rising African-American musical legends, such as Charles Mingus, Dinah Washington, and Wes Montgomery.

Over the course of his illustrious life, Mr. Hampton would receive awards and accolades, including numerous honorary doctorates in Music, Humanities, and Fine Arts and the presidential Medal of Freedom.  The Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival at the University of Idaho is named in his honor. This year’s festival is February 20-23.  Lionel Hampton passed away in 2002, at the age of 94, yet his legacy continues to inspire new generations of musicians.

So, we’ve introduced you to Lionel Hampton and described part of his legacy, alive at the National Archives.  Now, go check out some of his music! I think he’d really get a kick out of that.

Additional NARA references of interest:

  1. Lionel Hampton Memories of Japan (motion picture/film).

(Archival Research Catalog) ARC ID: 48561. Local ID 306-2107

  1. Lionel Hampton Interview (sound recording). ARC ID: 134842. Local ID: 306-EN-71-4542.
  2. Nelson interview with Lionel Hampton before European Trip 3/3/1971. (sound recording). ARC ID: 134731.  Local ID: 306-EN-71-2676.

http://www.archives.gov/research/arc/new-arc.html

Hamptom Blog Images

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Nobel Prize winning scientists associated with the Manhattan Project.

by Ms. Rania Mahmoud

Patent records (RG 326 – Records of the Atomic Energy Commission, Office of the General Counsel: Subject File Relating to Patents, 1942-1965, Entry A1 66) that have recently been declassified include signed original documents by several renowned Nobel Prize-winning scientists associated with the Manhattan Project.

These AEC records from the 1940’s and 1950’s contain a variety of documents to include daily correspondence letters signed by Lieutenant General Leslie Groves, the Director of the Manhattan Project, and Enrico Fermi’s 1953 General Release and Waiver letter.  Enrico Fermi was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1938.  Other original signatures in this record series include 1939 Nobel Prize recipient Ernest Lawrence, 1951 Nobel Prize recipient Glenn Seaborg and famed nuclear physicist, Edward Teller.

Major General L. R. Groves, letter dated 27 May 1944.

Edward Teller Letter, dated 17 July 1944.

fermi_release_001

Enrico Fermi, Docket, dated 15 June 1953

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